Thursday, July 28, 2011

Giant Osage Indian Skeletons Unearthed in Illinois Burial Mounds




What is known as the Sugar Loaf Burial Mound has been recently purchased by the Osage Indians in St. Louis, formerly known as Mound City,  Osage ancestry built many of the burial mounds throughout Illinois, Indiana and Ohio.  All of their legends claim that they once lived in the Ohio Valley.  Because university archaeologist refuse to recognize the Osage as the builders of the mounds, the Native American Graves Protection Act is not invoked, that only applies to "known" tribes.  Until then university archaeologist continue to desecrate Osage burials.
     The following articles describing large skeletons is consistent with the Osage, who were known for their great height.

History of Daviess County, Illinois 1879
     The mounds on the bluff have nearly all been opened within the last two or three years by Louis A. Rowly, Esq., Mr. W. M. Snyder and Mr. John Dowling, assisted by Sidney Hunkins and Dr. W. S. Crawford. These gentlemen have taken much interest in these prehistoric structures, and have very carefully investigated them. In all that have been opened the excavators have found in the centre a pit that was evidently dug about two and a half feet below the original surface of the ground, about six feet long and four feet wide, in the form of a parallelogram. The bottom and sides of this pit are of hard clay. The bones in this pit indicate a race of gigantic stature, buried in a sitting posture around the sides of the pit, with legs extending towards the centre.

History of Mifflin County, Ohio, 1880
      South of this, on the banks of Peoria Lake, near the city of Peoria, Illinois, there were excavated a few years ago by the Scientific Association of Peoria the contents of a very large, oval mound, and in it were found three human skeletons, a man, a woman and a boy, all lying straight beside each other, the boy asleep on the woman’s arm. The skeleton of the boy was about three feet long, but the man and the woman had a stature of seven feet. The bones were decomposed rapidly on being exposed to the air, except the skulls, which being of a harder texture had better withstood the tooth of time.  Though these figures were of immense stature, their immense skulls were fully in proportion to their frames, and possessed of a frontal development of reasoning powers of immense size.

History of Logan County, Illinois, 1886
      It is sometimes difficult to distinguish the place of sepulcher raised by the Mound Builders from the modern graves of the Indians.  The tombs of the former were in general larger than those of the latter, and were used as receptacles for a great number of bodies, and contained relics of art, evincing a higher decree of civilization than that attained by the Indians.
The ancient earthworks of the Mound Builders have occasionally been appropriated as burial places by the Indians, but the skeletons of the latter may be distinguished from the osteological remains of the former by their greater stature.

                                Giant Osage skeletons unearthed in burial mounds at Dunleith, Illinois

12th Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1890-1891
Dunleith Illinois
        No. 5, the largest of the group was carefully examined. Two feet below the surface, near the apex, was a skeleton, doubtless an intrusive Indian burial...Near the original surface, 10 or 12 feet from the center, on the lower side, lying at full length on its back, was one of the largest skeletons discovered by the Bureau agents, the length as proved by actual measurement being between 7 and 8 feet. It was clearly traceable, but crumbled to pieces immediately after removal from the hard earth in which it was encased.