Friday, July 22, 2011

Archaeologists "Destroy" According to 'Smithsonian Magazine"

 Archaeologists "Destroy" According to 'Smithsonian Magazine"


University students obliterating a Sioux burial  mound in southern Illinois for college credits.

   In  the June 2011 issue of Smithsonian Magazine ran an article entitled "Dig, Drink and be Merry" archaeology is  a destructive science. Archaeologist Patrick McGovern said "Archaeology is, at heart, a destructive science, McGovern recently told an audience at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian: "Every time you excavate, you destroy."
  This is the case when it comes to burial mounds in the states of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and Kentucky.  University archaeologists believe that the ancient remnants of burial mounds and earthworks are theirs to dig and destroy at will. Despite the passage of the Native American Graves Protection Act that prohibits the destruction of burial mounds, the universities circumvent this law by not claiming the tribal affiliations of the mound builders.
   This is in contrast to earlier researchers who were convinced that the mounds around the Great Lakes were associate with the early Iroquois and those in the Ohio Valley, known as the Hopewell were Sioux.
They used artifacts, skeletal remains, religious icons and a host of other scientific evaluations to come to these conclusions.
   Modern archaeologists use a host of "phases" and  "focus" to hide the identity of the builders of the mound builders and thus continue their destruction. Some amateur archaeologists have admited that in a hundred years people will look back at this era of archaeology and claim it to be the Dark Ages of American history and archaeology.