Thursday, May 9, 2013

The Bibles Pre-Flood Nephilim Giants

The Bibles Pre-Flood Nephilim Giants



Such men are first written of in Genesis vi. 4, under the name of Nephilim, as follows : " There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men, which were of old, men of renown." After the time when these mar vellous Nephilim came upon the earth, the sons of God, mingling with the daughters of men, produced a race of violent and powerful Gibborim, who were not necessarily giants in our sense of the word, al though they were generally represented to be such. Opinions vary upon the question who were "the sons of God," the parents of these people; some Hebraists conceiving them to have been men of power, and others, men with great gifts. The Easterns themselves have, however, indulged in the wildest fancies about these children of the Creator, and have invented various distorted legends respect ing them. According to the spurious book of Enoch, certain angels sent by God to guard the earth were seduced from their allegiance by the beauty of the terrestrial women, by whom they had demoniacal sons three thousand cubits high. Some of these monsters were respectively named Aza, Azael, Leuixas, Machsael, and Schemchozai. Milton, in his Paradise Regained, makes Satan say to Belial :
" Before the Flood thou with thy lusty crew, False-titled sons of God, roaming the earth, Cast wanton eyes on the daughters of men, And coupled with them, and begot a race."

Before the Flood thou with thy lusty crew, False-titled sons of God, roaming the earth, Cast wanton eyes on the daughters of men, And coupled with them, and begot a race." However, the Deluge purged the world of these fallen angels and their monstrous children, and they afterwards existed only in imaginative nar rative. The stories of the commingling of these heaven-born rebels with the women of the earth have a close affinity to the Greek legends about the mythological deities having offspring by mortal women ; and also to the Indian notions of the solar and lunar races of men, Suras and Asuras, who, according to Hindu traditions, sprang from the gods.