Monday, August 18, 2014

"Lost City," Buried Beaneath Present Day Lexington, Kentucky

"Lost City," Buried Beaneath Present Day Lexington, Kentucky


Adena burial mound located near Lexington, Kentucky. Most of the mounds in Kentucky were obliterated by Kentucky archaeologists.

George W. Ranck, writing in 1872, also discussed this “lost city” buried beneath Lexington: I quote from Dr. Ranck:


“The city now known as Lexington, Kentucky, is built of the dust of a dead metropolis of a lost race, of whose name, and language, and history not a vestige is left. Even the bare fact of the existence of such a city, and such a people, on the site of the present Lexington, would never have been known but for the rapidly decaying remnants of ruins found by early pioneers and adventurers to the Elkhorn lands… The testimony of the learned Prof. C.S. Rafinesque, of Transylvania University, fully corresponds with this, and proves the former existence in and about the present Lexington of a powerful and somewhat enlightened ante-Indian nation.”

“Kentucky’s first historian [John Filson] tells us of stone sepulchres, at Lexington, built in pyramid shape, and still tenanted by human skeletons, as late as two years after the siege of Bryant’s Station. “They are built,” says he, “in a way totally different from that of the Indians.” Early in this century, a large circular earthen mound, about six feet in height, occupied a part of what is now called Spring street, between Hill and Maxwell… A stone mound, which stood not far from Russell’s Cave, in this county, was opened about 1815 and found to contain human bones.”